Uncommon Ground Rethinking the Human Place in Nature

Filename: uncommon-ground-rethinking-the-human-place-in-nature.pdf
ISBN: 0393315118
Release Date: 1996-10-17
Number of pages: 561
Author: William Cronon
Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company

Download and read online Uncommon Ground Rethinking the Human Place in Nature in PDF and EPUB Essays by revisionist historians, scientists, and cultural critics explore the connection between nature and American culture, analyzing how it is packaged and presented at places such as Sea World and the Nature Company stores


Uncommon Ground Rethinking the Human Place in Nature

Filename: uncommon-ground-rethinking-the-human-place-in-nature.pdf
ISBN: 9780393242522
Release Date: 1996-10-17
Number of pages: 560
Author: William Cronon
Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company

Download and read online Uncommon Ground Rethinking the Human Place in Nature in PDF and EPUB A controversial, timely reassessment of the environmentalist agenda by outstanding historians, scientists, and critics. In a lead essay that powerfully states the broad argument of the book, William Cronon writes that the environmentalist goal of wilderness preservation is conceptually and politically wrongheaded. Among the ironies and entanglements resulting from this goal are the sale of nature in our malls through the Nature Company, and the disputes between working people and environmentalists over spotted owls and other objects of species preservation. The problem is that we haven't learned to live responsibly in nature. The environmentalist aim of legislating humans out of the wilderness is no solution. People, Cronon argues, are inextricably tied to nature, whether they live in cities or countryside. Rather than attempt to exclude humans, environmental advocates should help us learn to live in some sustainable relationship with nature. It is our home.


The Virginian

Filename: the-virginian.pdf
ISBN: 9783955008321
Release Date: 2012-11-18
Number of pages: 352
Author: Owen Wister
Publisher: BookRix

Download and read online The Virginian in PDF and EPUB The Virginian ist die Geschichte eines einzelgängerischen Cowboys in Wyoming um 1880, der sich trotz des im Westen vorherrschenden Faustrechts an seinen persönlichen Ehrenkodex hält und so allerlei Unbilden übersteht. Owen Wister war der Sohn von Sarah und Owen Wister Sr. einer Patrizierfamilie aus Philadelphia und genoss so eine privilegierte Kindheit. Seine Großmutter war die britische Bühnenschauspielerin Fanny Kemble. Nach Schulaufenthalten in der Schweiz und in England studierte er an der renommierten St. Paul's School in Concord (New Hampshire) sowie später an der Harvard University. Dort begann er mit Beiträgen für die studentische Satirezeitschrift The Harvard Lampoon seine schriftstellerische Laufbahn und lernte seinen langjährigen Freund und späteren Präsidenten der USA, Theodore Roosevelt, kennen. 1882-1884 verbrachte er zwei Jahre in Paris. Nach seiner Rückkehr ließ er sich zunächst in New York nieder, wo er in einer Bank Anstellung fand. 1885 begann er ein Zweitstudium an der Harvard Law School. Seine Approbation als Rechtsanwalt erhielt er 1888. In dieser Zeit begann sich Wister verstärkt mit dem amerikanischen Westen zu beschäftigen. Dieses Thema entsprach ganz dem Zeitgeist; der Historiker Frederick Jackson Turner verklärte in dem einflussreichen Aufsatz The Significance of the Frontier in American History (1893) die Frontier, also die weiße Siedlungrenze im Westen, zum Geburtsort des amerikanischen Gemüts und des ihm angeblich eigenen Freiheits- und Selbstbehauptungswillens. Roosevelt legte in seinem Werk The Winning of the West (1889-96) die Bedeutung der Westexpansion für das Wohl der amerikanischen Nation dar. Während die "Zivilisierung" des Westens voranschritt, also die Vertreibung der indianischen Ureinwohner, die Besiedlung durch Weiße, und die politische Organisation der Westterritorien in US-Bundesstaaten, machte sich Wister an die Verklärung dieser verschwindenden Welt und prägte mit seinem ersten Roman The Virginian (1902; dt. Der Virginier, 1955)) den in dieser Zeit entstehenden Mythos vom "Wilden Westen" entscheidend mit.


Die Abenteuer meines ehemaligen Bankberaters

Filename: die-abenteuer-meines-ehemaligen-bankberaters.pdf
ISBN: 349926773X
Release Date: 2014-04-01
Number of pages: 155
Author: Tilman Rammstedt
Publisher:

Download and read online Die Abenteuer meines ehemaligen Bankberaters in PDF and EPUB



Philosophische Untersuchung ber den Ursprung unserer Ideen vom Erhabenen und Sch nen

Filename: philosophische-untersuchung-ber-den-ursprung-unserer-ideen-vom-erhabenen-und-sch-nen.pdf
ISBN: 9783787323166
Release Date: 2017-08-28
Number of pages: 240
Author: Edmund Burke
Publisher: Felix Meiner Verlag

Download and read online Philosophische Untersuchung ber den Ursprung unserer Ideen vom Erhabenen und Sch nen in PDF and EPUB Dieses Werk von 1757 gilt als der klassische Text einer empirisch begründeten sensualistischen Ästhetik. Burkes Text hatte besonders wegen der erstmals ausgearbeiteten Unterscheidung der Begriffe des Erhabenen und Schönen eine nachhaltige Wirkung auf die spätere Ästhetik.


Toxic Archipelago

Filename: toxic-archipelago.pdf
ISBN: 9780295803012
Release Date: 2011-07-01
Number of pages: 352
Author: Brett L. Walker
Publisher: University of Washington Press

Download and read online Toxic Archipelago in PDF and EPUB Every person on the planet is entangled in a web of ecological relationships that link farms and factories with human consumers. Our lives depend on these relationships -- and are imperiled by them as well. Nowhere is this truer than on the Japanese archipelago. During the nineteenth century, Japan saw the rise of Homo sapiens industrialis, a new breed of human transformed by an engineered, industrialized, and poisonous environment. Toxins moved freely from mines, factory sites, and rice paddies into human bodies. Toxic Archipelago explores how toxic pollution works its way into porous human bodies and brings unimaginable pain to some of them. Brett Walker examines startling case studies of industrial toxins that know no boundaries: deaths from insecticide contaminations; poisonings from copper, zinc, and lead mining; congenital deformities from methylmercury factory effluents; and lung diseases from sulfur dioxide and asbestos. This powerful, probing book demonstrates how the Japanese archipelago has become industrialized over the last two hundred years -- and how people and the environment have suffered as a consequence.


Humans in Nature

Filename: humans-in-nature.pdf
ISBN: 9780199347230
Release Date: 2013-11-04
Number of pages: 272
Author: Gregory E. Kaebnick
Publisher: Oxford University Press

Download and read online Humans in Nature in PDF and EPUB Contemporary debates over issues as wide-ranging as the protection of wildernesses and endangered species, the spread of genetically modified organisms, the emergence of synthetic biology, and the advance of human enhancement, all of which seem to spin into deeper and more baffling questions with every change in the news cycle, often circle back to the same fundamental question: should there be limits to the human alteration of the natural world? A growing number of people view the human capacity to alter natural states of affairs -- from formerly wild spaces and things around us to crops and livestock to our own human nature -- as cause for moral alarm. That reaction raises a number of perplexing philosophical questions, however: Can we identify "natural" states of affairs at all? Does the idea of being morally concerned about the human relationship to nature make any sense? Should such a concern influence public policy and politics, or should government stay strenuously neutral on such matters? Through a study of moral debates about the environment, agricultural biotechnology, synthetic biology, and human enhancement, Gregory E. Kaebnick, a research scholar at The Hastings Center and editor of the Hastings Center Report, argues that concerns about the human alteration of nature can be legitimate and serious, but also that they are complex, contestable, and of limited political force. Kaebnick defends attempts to identify "natural" states of affairs by disentangling the nature/artifact distinction from metaphysical hoariness. Drawing on David Hume, he also defends moral standards for the human relationship to nature, arguing that they, and moral standards generally, should be understood as grounded in what Hume called the "passions." Yet what counts as "natural" can be delineated only roughly, he concludes, and moral standards for interaction with nature are less a matter of obligation than of ideals. Kaebnick also concludes, drawing on an interpretation of the liberal principle of neutrality, that government may support those standards but must be careful not to enforce them. Thus Kaebnick looks for a middle way on debates that have tended toward polarization. "As differences between nature and artifact become steadily less substantial, problems about preservation run to the core of how people can make sense of themselves, of each other, and of our shared world. Kaebnick's solutions are creative and compelling, theoretically elegant and politically practical. Providing distinctive ways forward, when much academic and policy discussion seems exhausted, his book demands wide attention. In return, it inspires hope." - James Nelson, Michigan State University


A History of Environmentalism

Filename: a-history-of-environmentalism.pdf
ISBN: 9781441170514
Release Date: 2014-07-31
Number of pages: 208
Author: Marco Armiero
Publisher: A&C Black

Download and read online A History of Environmentalism in PDF and EPUB 'Think globally, act locally' has become a call to environmentalist mobilization, proposing a closer connection between global concerns, local issues and individual responsibility. A History of Environmentalism explores this dialectic relationship, with ten contributors from a range of disciplines providing a history of environmentalism which frames global themes and narrates local stories. Each of the chapters in this volume addresses specific struggles in the history of environmental movements, for example over national parks, species protection, forests, waste, contamination, nuclear energy and expropriation. A diverse range of environments and environmental actors are covered, including the communities in the Amazonian Forest, the antelope in Tibet, atomic power plants in Europe and oil and politics in the Niger Delta. The chapters demonstrate how these conflicts make visible the intricate connections between local and global, the body and the environment, and power and nature. A History of Environmentalism tells us much about transformations of cultural perceptions and ways of production and consuming, as well as ecological and social changes. More than offering an exhaustive picture of the entire environmentalist movement, A History of Environmentalism highlights the importance of the experience of environmentalism within local communities. It offers a worldwide and polyphonic perspective, making it key reading for students and scholars of global and environmental history and political ecology.


A Storied Wilderness

Filename: a-storied-wilderness.pdf
ISBN: 9780295802978
Release Date: 2011-07-01
Number of pages: 320
Author: James W. Feldman
Publisher: University of Washington Press

Download and read online A Storied Wilderness in PDF and EPUB The Apostle Islands are a solitary place of natural beauty, with red sandstone cliffs, secluded beaches, and a rich and unique forest surrounded by the cold, blue waters of Lake Superior. But this seemingly pristine wilderness has been shaped and reshaped by humans. The people who lived and worked in the Apostles built homes, cleared fields, and cut timber in the island forests. The consequences of human choices made more than a century ago can still be read in today�s wild landscapes. A Storied Wilderness traces the complex history of human interaction with the Apostle Islands. In the 1930s, resource extraction made it seem like the islands� natural beauty had been lost forever. But as the island forests regenerated, the ways that people used and valued the islands changed - human and natural processes together led to the rewilding of the Apostles. In 1970, the Apostles were included in the national park system and ultimately designated as the Gaylord Nelson Wilderness. How should we understand and value wild places with human pasts? James Feldman argues convincingly that such places provide the opportunity to rethink the human place in nature. The Apostle Islands are an ideal setting for telling the national story of how we came to equate human activity with the loss of wilderness characteristics, when in reality all of our cherished wild places are the products of the complicated interactions between human and natural history. Watch the book trailer: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=frECwkA6oHs


Environmentalism

Filename: environmentalism.pdf
ISBN: 0415206243
Release Date: 2003
Number of pages: 608
Author: David Pepper
Publisher: Taylor & Francis

Download and read online Environmentalism in PDF and EPUB


On the Edge of Purgatory

Filename: on-the-edge-of-purgatory.pdf
ISBN: 9780803262751
Release Date: 2012-01-01
Number of pages: 176
Author: Bonnie J. Clark
Publisher: U of Nebraska Press

Download and read online On the Edge of Purgatory in PDF and EPUB Southeastern Colorado was known as the northernmost boundary of New Spain in the sixteenth century. By the late 1800s, the region was U.S. territory, but the majority of settlers remained Hispanic families. They had a complex history of interaction with indigenous populations in the area and adopted many of the indigenous methods of survival in this difficult environment. Today their descendants compose a vocal part of the Hispanic population of Colorado. Bonnie J. Clark investigates the unwritten history of this unique Hispanic population. Combining archaeological research, contemporary ethnography, and oral and documentary history, Clark examines the everyday lives of this population over time. Framing this discussion within the wider context of the changing economic and political processes at work, Clark looks at how changing and contesting ethnic and gender identities were experienced on a daily basis. Providing new insights into the construction of ethnic identity in the American West over hundreds of years, this study complicates and enriches our understanding of the role of Hispanic populations in the West.


The Republic of Nature

Filename: the-republic-of-nature.pdf
ISBN: 9780295804149
Release Date: 2012-03-20
Number of pages: 520
Author: Mark Fiege
Publisher: University of Washington Press

Download and read online The Republic of Nature in PDF and EPUB In the dramatic narratives that comprise The Republic of Nature, Mark Fiege reframes the canonical account of American history based on the simple but radical premise that nothing in the nation's past can be considered apart from the natural circumstances in which it occurred. Revisiting historical icons so familiar that schoolchildren learn to take them for granted, he makes surprising connections that enable readers to see old stories in a new light. Among the historical moments revisited here, a revolutionary nation arises from its environment and struggles to reconcile the diversity of its people with the claim that nature is the source of liberty. Abraham Lincoln, an unlettered citizen from the countryside, steers the Union through a moment of extreme peril, guided by his clear-eyed vision of nature's capacity for improvement. In Topeka, Kansas, transformations of land and life prompt a lawsuit that culminates in the momentous civil rights case of Brown v. Board of Education. By focusing on materials and processes intrinsic to all things and by highlighting the nature of the United States, Fiege recovers the forgotten and overlooked ground on which so much history has unfolded. In these pages, the nation's birth and development, pain and sorrow, ideals and enduring promise come to life as never before, making a once-familiar past seem new. The Republic of Nature points to a startlingly different version of history that calls on readers to reconnect with fundamental forces that shaped the American experience. For more information, visit the author's website: http://republicofnature.com/


Inherited Land

Filename: inherited-land.pdf
ISBN: 9781630876241
Release Date: 2011-08-04
Number of pages: 278
Author: Whitney A. Bauman
Publisher: Wipf and Stock Publishers

Download and read online Inherited Land in PDF and EPUB "Religion and ecology" has arrived. What was once a niche interest for a few academics concerned with environmental issues and a few environmentalists interested in religion has become an established academic field with classic texts, graduate programs, regular meetings at academic conferences, and growing interest from other academics and the mass media. Theologians, ethicists, sociologists, and other scholars are engaged in a broad dialogue about the ways religious studies can help understand and address environmental problems, including the sorts of methodological, terminological, and substantive debates that characterize any academic discourse. This book recognizes the field that has taken shape, reflects on the ways it is changing, and anticipates its development in the future. The essays offer analyses and reflections from emerging scholars of religion and ecology, each addressing her or his own specialty in light of two questions: (1) What have we inherited from the work that has come before us? and (2) What inquiries, concerns, and conversation partners should be central to the next generation of scholarship? The aim of this volume is not to lay out a single and clear path forward for the field. Rather, the authors critically reflect on the field from within, outline some of the major issues we face in the academy, and offer perspectives that will nurture continued dialogue.


Mount Mitchell and the Black Mountains

Filename: mount-mitchell-and-the-black-mountains.pdf
ISBN: 9780807863145
Release Date: 2003-12-04
Number of pages: 352
Author: Timothy Silver
Publisher: Univ of North Carolina Press

Download and read online Mount Mitchell and the Black Mountains in PDF and EPUB Each year, thousands of tourists visit Mount Mitchell, the most prominent feature of North Carolina's Black Mountain range and the highest peak in the eastern United States. From Native Americans and early explorers to land speculators and conservationists, people have long been drawn to this rugged region. Timothy Silver explores the long and complicated history of the Black Mountains, drawing on both the historical record and his experience as a backpacker and fly fisherman. He chronicles the geological and environmental forces that created this intriguing landscape, then traces its history of environmental change and human intervention from the days of Indian-European contact to today. Among the many tales Silver recounts is that of Elisha Mitchell, the renowned geologist and University of North Carolina professor for whom Mount Mitchell is named, who fell to his death there in 1857. But nature's stories--of forest fires, chestnut blight, competition among plants and animals, insect invasions, and, most recently, airborne toxins and acid rain--are also part of Silver's narrative, making it the first history of the Appalachians in which the natural world gets equal time with human history. It is only by understanding the dynamic between these two forces, Silver says, that we can begin to protect the Black Mountains for future generations.