The quest for environmental justice

Filename: the-quest-for-environmental-justice.pdf
ISBN: UOM:39015062891729
Release Date: 2005
Number of pages: 393
Author: Robert Doyle Bullard
Publisher:

Download and read online The quest for environmental justice in PDF and EPUB In 1994, Sierra Club Books was proud to publish Dr. Robert D. Bullard's Unequal Protection: Environmental Justice and Communities of Color, a collection of essays contributed by some of the leading participants in the First National People of Color Environmental Leadership Summit, which focused attention on "environmental racism"--racial discrimination in environmental policymaking and the enforcement of environmental protection laws and regulations. Now, picking up where that groundbreaking anthology left off, Dr. Bullard has assembled a new collection of essays that capture the voices of frontline warriors who are battling environmental injustice and human rights abuses at the grassroots level around the world and challenging government and industry policies and globalization trends that place people of color and the poor at special risk. Part I presents an overview of the early environmental justice movement and highlights key leadership roles assumed by women activists. Part II examines the lives of people living in "sacrifice zones"--toxic corridors (such as Louisiana's infamous "Cancer Alley") where high concentrations of polluting industries are found. Part III explores land use, land rights, resource extraction, and sustainable development conflicts, including Chicano struggles in America's Southwest. Part IV examines human rights and global justice issues, including an analysis of South Africa's legacy of environmental racism and the corruption and continuing violence plaguing the oil-rich Niger delta. Together, the diverse contributors to this much-anticipated follow-up anthology present an inspiring and illuminating picture of the environmental justice movement in the first decade of the twenty-first century. In 1994, Sierra Club Books was proud to publish Dr. Robert D. Bullard's Unequal Protection: Environmental Justice and Communities of Color, a collection of essays contributed by some of the leading participants in the First National People of Color Environmental Leadership Summit, which focused attention on "environmental racism"--racial discrimination in environmental policymaking and the enforcement of environmental protection laws and regulations. Now, picking up where that groundbreaking anthology left off, Dr. Bullard has assembled a new collection of essays that capture the voices of frontline warriors who are battling environmental injustice and human rights abuses at the grassroots level around the world and challenging government and industry policies and globalization trends that place people of color and the poor at special risk. Part I presents an overview of the early environmental justice movement and highlights key leadership roles assumed by women activists. Part II examines the lives of people living in "sacrifice zones"--toxic corridors (such as Louisiana's infamous "Cancer Alley") where high concentrations of polluting industries are found. Part III explores land use, land rights, resource extraction, and sustainable development conflicts, including Chicano struggles in America's Southwest. Part IV examines human rights and global justice issues, including an analysis of South Africa's legacy of environmental racism and the corruption and continuing violence plaguing the oil-rich Niger delta. Together, the diverse contributors to this much-anticipated follow-up anthology present an inspiring and illuminating picture of the environmental justice movement in the first decade of the twenty-first century.


Recasting the Social in Citizenship

Filename: recasting-the-social-in-citizenship.pdf
ISBN: 9780802097576
Release Date: 2008
Number of pages: 331
Author: Engin Fahri Isin
Publisher: University of Toronto Press

Download and read online Recasting the Social in Citizenship in PDF and EPUB Engin F. Isin and the volume's contributors explore the social sites that have become objects of government, and considers how these subjects are sites of contestation, resistance, differentiation and identification.


Urban Ecologies

Filename: urban-ecologies.pdf
ISBN: 9780739195765
Release Date: 2014-12-11
Number of pages: 268
Author: Christopher Schliephake
Publisher: Lexington Books

Download and read online Urban Ecologies in PDF and EPUB The term “urban ecology” has become a buzzword in various disciplines, including the social and natural sciences as well as urban planning and architecture. The environmental humanities have been slow to adapt to current theoretical debates, often excluding human-built environments from their respective frameworks. This book closes this gap both in theory and in practice, bringing together “urban ecology” with ecocritical and cultural ecological approaches by conceptualizing the city as an integral part of the environment and as a space in which ecological problems manifest concretely. Arguing that culture has to be seen as an active component and integral factor within urban ecologies, it makes use of a metaphorical use of the term, perceiving cities as spatial phenomena that do not only have manifold and complex material interrelations with their respective (natural) environments, but that are intrinsically connected to the ideas, imaginations, and interpretations that make up the cultural symbolic and discursive side of our urban lives and that are stored and constantly renegotiated in their cultural and artistic representations. The city is, within this framework, both seen as an ecosystemically organized space as well as a cultural artifact. Thus, the urban ecology outlined in this study takes its main impetus from an analysis of examples taken from contemporary culture that deal with urban life and the complex interrelations between urban communities and their (natural and built) environments.


The Rise of the U S Environmental Health Movement

Filename: the-rise-of-the-u-s-environmental-health-movement.pdf
ISBN: 144222245X
Release Date: 2015-04-09
Number of pages: 288
Author: Kate Davies
Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield

Download and read online The Rise of the U S Environmental Health Movement in PDF and EPUB This is the first book to offer a comprehensive examination of the Environmental Health Movement, which unlike many parts of the environmental movement, focuses on ways toxic chemicals and other hazardous agents in the environmental effect human health and well-being.


Oil Injustice

Filename: oil-injustice.pdf
ISBN: 9781442208636
Release Date: 2011-09-16
Number of pages: 388
Author: Patricia Widener, Florida Atlantic University
Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield Publishers

Download and read online Oil Injustice in PDF and EPUB Oil Injustice examines the mobilization efforts of communities and environmental organizations in response to the construction of a cross-country oil pipeline in Ecuador. Local mobilization efforts gave rise to the establishment of two transnational campaigns, one of opposition and one of negotiation, which emphasized calls for greater conservation while diluting local demands for environmental justice and community participation in national and global decisions. These Ecuadorian cases suggest that the majority of community activists and NGOs alongside their transnational advocates were forced to seek local change rather than attempt to defeat a global, unequal and disabling system.


Resisting Global Toxics

Filename: resisting-global-toxics.pdf
ISBN: 9780262264235
Release Date: 2007-08-10
Number of pages: 358
Author: David Naguib Pellow
Publisher: MIT Press

Download and read online Resisting Global Toxics in PDF and EPUB Every year, nations and corporations in the "global North" produce millions of tons of toxic waste. Too often this hazardous material -- inked to high rates of illness and death and widespread ecosystem damage -- is exported to poor communities of color around the world. In Resisting Global Toxics, David Naguib Pellow examines this practice and charts the emergence of transnational environmental justice movements to challenge and reverse it. Pellow argues that waste dumping across national boundaries from rich to poor communities is a form of transnational environmental inequality that reflects North/South divisions in a globalized world, and that it must be theorized in the context of race, class, nation, and environment. Building on environmental justice studies, environmental sociology, social movement theory, and race theory, and drawing on his own research, interviews, and participant observations, Pellow investigates the phenomenon of global environmental inequality and considers the work of activists, organizations, and networks resisting it. He traces the transnational waste trade from its beginnings in the 1980s to the present day, examining global garbage dumping, the toxic pesticides that are the legacy of the Green Revolution in agriculture, and today's scourge of dumping and remanufacturing high tech and electronics products. The rise of the transnational environmental movements described in Resisting Global Toxics charts a pragmatic path toward environmental justice, human rights, and sustainability.


Environmental Justice in the New Millennium

Filename: environmental-justice-in-the-new-millennium.pdf
ISBN: 9780230622531
Release Date: 2009-06-22
Number of pages: 283
Author: F. Steady
Publisher: Springer

Download and read online Environmental Justice in the New Millennium in PDF and EPUB Environmental Justice is one of the most important human rights challenges today. It refers to inequitable environmental burdens born by groups such as racial minorities, residents of economically disadvantaged areas, or residents of developing nations. This book explores this subject with case studies from various parts of the world.


Der Weltklimavertrag

Filename: der-weltklimavertrag.pdf
ISBN: 9783658041465
Release Date: 2013-11-08
Number of pages: 231
Author: Janine Bentz-Hölzl
Publisher: Springer-Verlag

Download and read online Der Weltklimavertrag in PDF and EPUB Der anthropogen induzierte Klimawandel führt weltweit zu tiefgreifenden ökologischen, ökonomischen und sozialen Veränderungen. Janine Bentz-Hölzl entwickelt Grundlagen für einen Weltklimavertrag, der die Rechte und Pflichten von Staaten in der internationalen Klimapolitik definiert und den Anspruch an Klimagerechtigkeit erfüllt. Distributive und korrektive Gerechtigkeitsansprüche heutiger und künftiger Generationen werden gegenübergestellt, um einen neuen Lösungsansatz zu entwickeln. Dieser sieht eine gerechte Verteilung der Nutzungsrechte an der Ressource Atmosphäre vor und begründet gleichzeitig ein faires „burden sharing“ der Kosten des Klimawandels. Für die Realisierung des Weltklimavertrages wird die Schaffung einer internationalen Organisation für Klima und Umwelt sowie eines Globalen Umweltgerichtshofes begründet.


Research Handbook on Human Rights and the Environment

Filename: research-handbook-on-human-rights-and-the-environment.pdf
ISBN: 9781782544432
Release Date: 2015-06-29
Number of pages: 592
Author: Anna Grear
Publisher: Edward Elgar Publishing

Download and read online Research Handbook on Human Rights and the Environment in PDF and EPUB Bringing together leading international scholars in the field, this Research Handbook interrogates, from various angles and positions, the fractious relationship between human rights and the environment and between human rights and environmental law.


The Deindustrialized World

Filename: the-deindustrialized-world.pdf
ISBN: 9780774834964
Release Date: 2017-07-20
Number of pages: 388
Author: Steven High
Publisher: UBC Press

Download and read online The Deindustrialized World in PDF and EPUB Since the 1970s, the closure of mines, mills, and factories has marked a rupture in working-class lives. The Deindustrialized World interrogates the process of industrial ruination, from the first impact of layoffs in metropolitan cities, suburban areas, and single-industry towns to the shock waves that rippled outward, affecting entire regions, countries, and beyond. Scholars from five nations share personal stories of ruin and ruination and ask others what it means to be working class in a postindustrial world. Together, they open a window on the lived experiences of people living at ground zero of deindustrialization, revealing its layered impacts and examining how workers, environmentalists, activists, and the state have responded to its challenges.


The Oxford Handbook of Environmental History

Filename: the-oxford-handbook-of-environmental-history.pdf
ISBN: 9780190673482
Release Date: 2017-03-01
Number of pages: 800
Author: Andrew C. Isenberg
Publisher: Oxford University Press

Download and read online The Oxford Handbook of Environmental History in PDF and EPUB The field of environmental history emerged just decades ago but has established itself as one of the most innovative and important new approaches to history, one that bridges the human and natural world, the humanities and the sciences. With the current trend towards internationalizing history, environmental history is perhaps the quintessential approach to studying subjects outside the nation-state model, with pollution, global warming, and other issues affecting the earth not stopping at national borders. With 25 essays, this Handbook is global in scope and innovative in organization, looking at the field thematically through such categories as climate, disease, oceans, the body, energy, consumerism, and international relations.


Hazardous Waste and Pollution

Filename: hazardous-waste-and-pollution.pdf
ISBN: 9783319180816
Release Date: 2015-10-12
Number of pages: 179
Author: Tanya Wyatt
Publisher: Springer

Download and read online Hazardous Waste and Pollution in PDF and EPUB This volume examines crimes that violate environmental regulations, as part of an emerging area of criminology known as green criminology. The contributions to this book examine criminal justice concerns related to regulating and enforcing environmental laws, as well as the consequences for families and communities impacted by hazardous waste and pollution. It also describes possible strategies for deterring and preventing organized crime related to environmental regulations, including black market sales of ozone depleting substances. This innovative volume provides a criminological framework for understanding environmental harms. Examining cases from the US, Europe and Australia, this volume compares and contrasts international approaches for regulating hazardous substances, and enforcing those regulations. This work will be of interest to researchers in criminology and criminal justice, particularly interested in green criminology or environmental law, as well as researchers in environmental sciences, white collar and corporate crime, and policymakers.


Environmental Justice

Filename: environmental-justice.pdf
ISBN: 9781136619236
Release Date: 2012-03-15
Number of pages: 272
Author: Gordon Walker
Publisher: Routledge

Download and read online Environmental Justice in PDF and EPUB Environmental justice has increasingly become part of the language of environmental activism, political debate, academic research and policy making around the world. It raises questions about how the environment impacts on different people’s lives. Does pollution follow the poor? Are some communities far more vulnerable to the impacts of flooding or climate change than others? Are the benefits of access to green space for all, or only for some? Do powerful voices dominate environmental decisions to the exclusion of others? This book focuses on such questions and the complexities involved in answering them. It explores the diversity of ways in which environment and social difference are intertwined and how the justice of their interrelationship matters. It has a distinctive international perspective, tracing how the discourse of environmental justice has moved around the world and across scales to include global concerns, and examining research, activism and policy development in the US, the UK, South Africa and other countries. The widening scope and diversity of what has been positioned within an environmental justice ‘frame’ is also reflected in chapters that focus on waste, air quality, flooding, urban greenspace and climate change. In each case, the basis for evidence of inequalities in impacts, vulnerabilities and responsibilities is examined, asking questions about the knowledge that is produced, the assumptions involved and the concepts of justice that are being deployed in both academic and political contexts. Environmental Justice offers a wide ranging analysis of this rapidly evolving field, with compelling examples of the processes involved in producing inequalities and the challenges faced in advancing the interests of the disadvantaged. It provides a critical framework for understanding environmental justice in various spatial and political contexts, and will be of interest to those studying Environmental Studies, Geography, Politics and Sociology.


Reclaiming Nature

Filename: reclaiming-nature.pdf
ISBN: 9781843313465
Release Date: 2007
Number of pages: 428
Author: James K. Boyce
Publisher: Anthem Press

Download and read online Reclaiming Nature in PDF and EPUB In ‘Reclaiming Nature’, leading environmental thinkers from across the globe explore the relationship between human activities and the natural. This is a bold and comprehensive text of major interest to both students of the environment and professionals involved in policy-making.


Social Movement to Address Climate Change

Filename: social-movement-to-address-climate-change.pdf
ISBN: 9781604976410
Release Date: 2009
Number of pages: 497
Author: Danielle Endres
Publisher: Cambria Press

Download and read online Social Movement to Address Climate Change in PDF and EPUB "Deniers of climate change have benefited from political strategies developed by conservative think tanks and public relations experts paid handsomely by the energy industry. With this book, environmental activists can benefit from some scholarly attention turned to their efforts. This book exhibits the best that public scholarship has to offer. Its authors utilize sophisticated rhetorical theory and criticism to uncover the inventional constraints and possibilities for participants at various sites of the Step-It-Up day of climate activism. What makes this book especially valuable is that it is not only directed to fellow communication scholars, but is written in a clear and accessible style to bring the insights of an academic field to a broader public of activists committed to building an environmental social movement." - Prof. Leah Ceccarelli, University of Washington "This is an unusually interesting volume grounded in a sustained and coordinated analysis of the Step It Up campaign. Generating a multifaceted and shared archive for analyzing the SIU campaign on global warming, the volume's multiple authors critically examine intersecting dimensions of the SIU campaign-its persuasive strategies, organizational dynamics, and political practices for everyday citizens-with an eye on implications for enhancing the larger environmental movement. Readers with a practical and theoretical interest in social and political movements will find this book engaging and leavened with heuristic value." - Professor Robert L. Ivie, Indiana University, Bloomington